More effort needed to combat warming

Two hundred medical journals have reported health is already affected globally. Mortality is approaching 50% in older people. The most vulnerable are older people and those with underlying medical problems. More and more children are succumbing.

Does this sound familiar? It is the same story we are reading daily about the coronavirus pandemic — but the scientists this time are reporting on the mortality of heat waves due to global warming. Heat waves kill and are more frequent as global warming increases. Here in the U.S., we are experiencing year after year of increased temperatures with the past year being the warmest ever recorded.

We see the response to mandated vaccine immunization with reduced mortality and morbidity from the coronavirus. Mandates by governments and businesses have encouraged many people to get vaccinated. More and more we see the benefit of change for the benefit of the common good as well as the individual.

While victory over the pandemic cannot be declared yet, we see the path ahead as one of collective vaccination. We have little time left to declare an emergency response to “catastrophic, runaway climate change,” the scientists tell us. Just as we got the vaccines in record time, so we have the information and practical solutions for holding global warming below 1.5 degrees Centigrade. Renewable energy costs are dropping rapidly. Economists tell us the “slow transition” preferred by the fossil fuel industry is far more expensive in the long run than a “fast transition” where savings come later.

We learned belatedly that we must cooperate to win the war against the pandemic and, again belatedly, are learning the same lesson about combating global warming. Do your part by reducing your energy costs, writing your congressperson, joining Citizens’ Climate Lobby and supporting the transition to a green economy.

Peter Whitis

Altoona

A critical time for wolves discussion

On Monday at 7 p.m. on WORT’s Radio Access Hour, there will be an in-depth conversation about Wisconsin’s 31st Wolf Awareness Week with guests Adrian Wydeven, who led the Wisconsin DNR Wolf Recovery Program from 1990 through 2013; and Peter David, a wildlife biologist with the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission.

This is a critical time for wolves in Wisconsin. On Nov. 6 a wolf hunt had been scheduled by the Natural Resources Board with a quota of 300, much higher than the 130 announced by the DNR.

There has been insufficient time to complete an update to the wolf management plan and no way to determine how much loss happened as a result of the February hunt, which was held during prime breeding season. A count cannot account for losses due to other causes such as injuries, illness and accidents. The conversation on WORTfm.org (89.9) will provide information on the status of the wolf in Wisconsin and the challenges going forward.

Kristy Jensch

Washburn

Administration is like a nursery rhyme

As I was watching TV recently, I saw three of the most corrupt humans walking this planet. Yes, there they were: Wynken (Vice President Kamala Harris), Blynken (Tony Blinken) and Nod (President Joe Biden).

Biden was spewing more of his lies. Remember the nursery rhyme from years ago? Wynken, Blynken and Nod one night sailed off in a wooden shoe, etc., etc. Dear God: Please find them and put them back in their boat, along with Jen Psaki and Nancy Pelosi, and see that they keep sailing into eternity. They never were and never will be needed. They have cost us lots of money and are responsible for the loss of many lives.

Can you imagine what a horror it is to stand and watch the Taliban beat your children? Lord help us. Get ready people, this could be the end of the world.

Sharon Carmen

Chippewa Falls

Measure outlawing words ill-advised

Recently, four Wisconsin legislators introduced a bill to outlaw the use of certain unacceptable words in K-12 schools, universities and technical schools. Their list included the words and phrases “diversity,” “equity,” “inclusion,” “social justice,” “restorative practices” and “restorative justice.”

If educators are found guilty of using these words, their school will lose 10% of their state funding. That legislation passed with all Republicans voting in favor, and all Democrats voting against.

As a university professor and volunteer facilitator for Barron County Restorative Justice Programs, I couldn’t believe my eyes when l read this legislation.

In 1998, Barron County Circuit Court Judge Ed Brunner, deeply troubled at having no alternative to the incarceration of nonviolent offenders, introduced Restorative Conferencing in Barron County.

Victims of nonviolent crime were given the opportunity to tell their offenders what they needed to feel whole again. Offenders, many first-time juvenile offenders, were given the opportunity to make amends and avoid incarceration.

I have served as a restorative conference facilitator for more than 20 years. Thanks to this program, nonviolent juvenile crime has plummeted. More than 10,000 victims and offenders have experienced the healing impact of restorative justice.

Barron County Restorative Justice Programs offers nine programs that restore lives and make communities safer. Those programs are described in a book I recently co-authored with Barron County Restorative Justice Programs operations leader Monika Audette.

If you have the opportunity to speak to legislators who voted to outlaw the use of the words “restorative justice” from Wisconsin schools, please urge them to read “From A Single Pebble: Barron County Restorative Justice Programs,” available at Amazon. The book will help them understand why restorative justice belongs in every school and every community.

Mary Hoeft

Rice Lake

Are face masks about virus or control?

“It’s only a mask.” “It is for the greater good.”

It is time that everyone needs to look behind the mask to see what is happening to this country. Is the mask about the virus or is it about control? Whether you think that everyone should be wearing a mask or not, always keep an eye on Washington, D.C. Remember: A magician always distracts his audience.

The freedoms that we, as American citizens, have are possible only through the risks and sacrifices made by our Founding Fathers and the military, both past and present. We have the responsibility to continue to fight to maintain this freedom that so many have given their lives for.

Please stand up for America. Freedom is not free.

Carol Peuse

Augusta